Monday, September 16, 2019

  • Suicide rates in the United States have risen nearly 30% since 1999, and mental health conditions are one of several factors contributing to suicide. In 2017 suicide was the 2nd leading course of death for the age 10-14 years, 15-19 years, 20-29 years, and 30-39 years. This is becoming a national epidemic that requires a multi-faceted approach. The panel discussion is to share with the audience current trends in suicide, screening tool(s) and intervention to bring awareness to the problem. While we may not have all the answers to address the increase in suicidality; sharing and bringing awareness is critical piece of confronting this problem.

    Panelist

     

    Reginald Bannerman

    Reginald E. Bannerman, RN, MSN, MBA, NE-BC (School of Nursing '97,'99,'03) is Director of Nursing at Children’s National Medical Center in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Shift Director at the Howard County General Hospital and is an Adjunct Faculty Member at George Washington University’s School of Nursing. The inpatient psychiatry services unit  for children and adolescents at Children's National was specifically designed to meet the developmental and psychiatric needs of children and one of the earliest pediatric programs in the nation. He oversees a multidisciplinary team composed of pediatric psychiatrists, nurses, social workers, academic counselors, psychologists, and expressive (art) therapists, who see to all aspects of care and Bannerman beams when he talks about the work of the nurses in the unit. He hails from a family of lawyers and doctors, and as a young person, leaned toward a career in medicine, but it wasn’t until he met his brother’s college roommate, who was a nurse, that he considered this noble profession. He’s proud to have helped foster a close-knit team that encourages patients through treatment, celebrates their every victory and advocates for awareness of mental health issues. Mr. Bannerman also currently serves on the Johns Hopkins Alumni Council, the governing body of the Johns Hopkins Alumni Association, as a member of the Executive Committee as Co-Chair of the Student Grants Committee.

     

       
    Holly Wilcox

     

    Holly C. Wilcox, Ph.D. (School of Public Health '03, '05) is a psychiatric epidemiologist and Associate Professor in the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, with a joint appointment in the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.  Her expertise is in suicide, depression and violence prevention research. She is currently involved in several prevention projects in schools, primary care, emergency departments and college campus settings. In addition to her research, she teaches two courses in the school of public health and has been recognized for excellence in teaching and advising students.

     

     

    Patty Wilson

    Patty R. Wilson, RN, PhD, PMHNP-BC,  is a faculty member at Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. Her  clinical practice and research focus on improving the lives of those who have experienced trauma and working to create community-based interventions that address social determinants of health and promote health equity in underserved minority populations. Dr. Wilson is a co-Principal Investigator of the Passport to Freedom program, which provides psycho-educational sessions to formerly incarcerated women to promote self-awareness of the link between trauma and health and strategies to cope with symptoms of trauma/stress. Dr. Wilson practices as a PMHNP in a community-based behavioral health office in Baltimore City. She is an alum of the ANA/SAMHSA Minority Fellowship Program and completed her doctoral and psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner studies at the University of Virginia School of Nursing.

     

     

     

     

       
    Melinda Walker

     

    Melinda Walker RN BSN BC, has been the ECT nurse coordinator since 2009 and holds dual specialties in psychiatric and post anesthesia care. She has functioned as the lead nurse at Johns Hopkins Hospital Brain Stimulation Unit for 10 years and has been board certified psychiatric nurse for 23 years at Johns Hopkins Hospital.